Geoff’s OO scale layout

“Hi Al, Geoff Tate here from Northumberland. I have been building a OO scale model railway in my 8 x 6 garden shed.
(its expanding into the garden now!)

Its no where near finished, but the pics help me identify what needs to be done. Control is DC, stock is mostly Hornby. Track is Hornby/Peco/Atlas.

I am also building a HO scale railroad in my garage in Florida (where I have more space). I started that one in April this year, in the space vacated by my 1982 Corvette! This one is DCC. No pics yet but back out next month so I will keep you posted.

Geoff”

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“Hi Al , Have been asked a few times re putting weights on to rolling stock to help keep them on the tracks ..well here is my answer with a couple of tips ..

Hope this can be of some use to some of the modellers experiencing these problems

Regards

Dave”



Latest ebay cheat sheet is here.

A big thanks to Dave and Geoff. Hope they’ve inspired you to roll up your sleeves and get going! The Beginner’s Guide is here if that’s you.

That’s all this time folks. Please do keep ’em coming.

Best

Al



15 responses to “Geoff’s OO scale layout”

  1. Rod Mackay says:

    Probably best not to force your back-to-back gauge between the wheels like that as most wheels are on little plastic insulating bushes round the axle and shoving the wheel out at an angle can crush the plastic and leave you a wobbly wheelset. I find if I take the wheels out I can shift them by twisting gently between three fingers of each hand, moving them out while keeping them at right angles to the axle. For really stubborn ones, I hold the axle firmly in pliers and use a tack-lifter between the pliers head and one wheel, so the V in the lifter goes either side of the axle and the ends press evenly on the wheel n line with the axle. The angled head of the lifter gives a leverage against the pliers so squeezing their handles towards each other gently gives you great control.

    If your back to back dimensions are right but you still get derailments, other things to look for are: little extra lips of plastic moulding flash, or slightly misplaced under frame details, stopping trucks (bogies) or coupler mounts turning freely; distortion of the car frame or mounts so the truck pivots are not perpendicular, which can be caused by, say, not getting the body back onto all its holding lugs after fitting lights, people or whatever; and finally are the NEM pockets that hold the coupler heads drooping? If so the coupling bars may be overriding when the train jerks or stops. A problem for UK modellers using tension lock couplings may be different makes not being compatible, which can lead to over-riding or one hook going to the side of the opposing bar and applying side force on a curve.
    Rod

  2. Tony Dodd says:

    There is a standard formula for weighting OO rolling stock:

    28g + 5g per cm of wheelbase length.

    I use DeLuxe Material’s “Liquid Weight” very successfully.

  3. Mike Pettruzzelli says:

    Definitely on the way Geoff….Be interesting to see how the outdoor extension comes out….As for extra weight in my cars I open them up and glue or use the “self-sticks” like Dave uses to hold them in place….Mike

  4. Ron Schultz says:

    I now find my self trying to count the ceiling panels on Dave’s RR to figure how large his room in the loft is . I can also see an other space behind the one end that looks like he has a den or room there At 8 feet per panel I figure his layout may be nearly 60 feet long. That’s why the long trains look so nice . Thanks for the train rides on your lay out .And all the tips. very welcome . Thanks, Ron In Ohio, USA

  5. Joe says:

    Hi Dave,
    I watch all of your posts and enjoy them greatly. I notice that you have numerous free standing buildings. Are they ready made buildings, snap or glue building kits, paper buildings glued over a stiffener or completely scratch built and hand decorated?
    Thanks and keep on a posting.

  6. Looks really good. Are you aware of Jenny Kirk’s modeling on You Tube? She too has expanded into her small garden area. One picture shows just thin plywood uder the reack. What kind of baseboard support are you using (I have a hard time with small print)?

  7. tom kocher says:

    Hi Geoff,

    I was born and raised in Sunbury, Thought I would get your thoughts on the pre-war Lionel 00 trains I have – some of which I am going to sell, since I am much older now .. and will likely not use them in a train layout ever again.

    I have two sets of the hudson engine and tender .. each with several cars. They are both in good condition. I also have a fair amount of the 3 rail track, with two switches as well.

    My Dad and Grandfather’s all worked on the railroad … initially right out of the Northumberland yard – and then subsequently out of the Baltimore Bay View yard .. which caused our eventual move to Baltimore.

    I would appreciate your thoughts on this when you have a moment.

    Thanks

    Tom Kocher

  8. Stephen D Gispanski says:

    Nice lay out, my father turned me on to O gauge when I was really young. Even at that time I did not know there were so many gauges. I can’t wait to start building mine. I like how you have yours spread out, I know you still have to install landscape and other businesses. But I think your lay out looks good. I have different lay outs for mine but we are going to move so my man cave is full of boxes that have HO & O gauges and a bunch of modules that are airplanes. Until then, I have a thought on how I am going set it up, and It will change by then. I will keep on looking.

  9. Harvey Trewarn says:

    When will someone post some photos of a layout that doesnt look like a kit plonked on a flat board. I am tired of seeing flat roads…flat villages….flat rivers…..flat construction sites….flat house blocks…..and even when someone does build a mountain side scene, the mountain looks like an ice cream cake in the middle of a kitchen table.
    If you ever take a ride in a helicopter and look down on the countryside…..NOWWHERE is ever completely flat…..not even the dessert.
    Get some imagination guys and show me a LIFELIKE scene.

  10. Alan Marriott says:

    I had a more practical way of weighting the rolling stock. I used $1 and later $2 coins. Always knew where there was spare cash if needed at 4 coins per carriage/wagon times 71 units. Did remember to remove them before heading off to PNG to work and gave the whole shebang away to a club member. Believe some of the 1.2km of track sections, 41 locos and 71 rolling stock are still running at model shows around Melbourne some three decades later but those I knew have long passed on. Still looking out for my Hornby Britannia loco acquired in 1973 for the princely sum of $7 from my 16th birthday gift money.

  11. Wallace Daffner says:

    If you put the weights inside the tank car it works just as well and doesn’t look so unreal.

  12. Ian Mc Donald says:

    thanks for the layout photos looking good. great how to and good to see some trains running.

  13. Greg says:

    Nice!!!!! As for weights in my cars I use stick on tire weights they come in 1/4 oz up too 1 oz they seem to work very well you have to be sure to center them so the car doesn’t lean. Can’t wait to see the expansion good luck.
    Happy Rails
    Greg SC USA

  14. Helmut Eppich says:

    Great running session! Always amazed at the layout’s size, detail, and amount of trains. Must have won some awards. I’m not too familiar with model railroading to know if there are any. If there were awards, you should receive one.

  15. d j howarth says:

    Hi Ron to answer your question re size , its just 30 ft. long and 8ft wide , always looks bigger on the screen ……and regards my building , some are scratch , a lot are the metcalfe card buildings that you build yourself , and a lot are the ready made ones which although expensive they do look good ….Dave

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